<HTML> <BODY bgColor=#5AB3C2> <TITLE>SFBARS</TITLE> <meta name="SFBARS" content="San Francisco Bay Area Rug Society."> <meta name="keywords" content="SFBARS, Rug Societies, San Francisco Bay Area Rug Society."> <SCRIPT language=JavaScript></SCRIPT> <STYLE type=text/css>BODY {FONT-FAMILY: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; bgcolor=#5AB3C2 } </STYLE> <h3><center>MEETINGS OF SFBARS 2001-2003</center></h3> 2001<p> Jan 23, 2001: Belkis Balpinar: Contemporary Tapestries in light of Turkish Kilims from the Past: Emmett Eiland's Oriental Carpet Co. Feb ? Mar 4, 2001: Prof. Johanna D. Movassat: Calligraphy in Islamic Art, Architecture and Weaving: The Abu Bakr Siddiq Mosque, Hayward April2001<p> APRIL 5 2001<br> WOVEN PASSION A JOURNEY TO POST EMBARGO IRAN<br> A slide presentation lecture by Roger G. Cavanna<br> Observations made during a recent visit to Iran including Tehran, Shiraz, Isfahan, Hamadan, Malayir & Mashad, Carpets of the Inner Circle, 444 Jackson Street, San Francisco, CA 94111 <a href=#"rc"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#rc">More information</a><p> April 8 and 22, 2001 Visit Jim Dixon s Occidental Home<a href=#"jd"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#jd">More information</a><p> May 10, 2001  Exploring Rugs from East Turkistan" Sandra Whitman, 7:30 PM, May 10, 2001 361 Oak Street San Francisco, CA 94102<a href=#"sw"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#sw">More information</a><p> August, 2001 Empire of the Sultans: Ottoman Art from the Khalili Collection The Asian Art Museum of San Francisco<a href=#"aa"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#aa">More information</a><p> September 30, 2001 Patricia T. Leiser, Mosaics: the missing link? 109 South Hall, UC Berkeley<a href=#"pl"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#pl">More information</a><p> October 23, 2001. Elena Tzareva,  Central Asian Rugs in the Russian Ethnographic Museum, The Sandra Whitman Gallery, 361 Oak Street, SF.<a href=#"et"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#et">More information</a><p> December 3, 2001 the Annual SFBARS Dinner<br> The Aegean Grill 1403 Solano Avenue (at Carmel St.) Albany, CA Featured Speaker Diane Mott, FAMSF<a href=#"dm"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#dm">More information</a><br> ***********<p> January 28, 2002 Parviz Tanavoli<br>  The Lion in the Art and Culture of Iran <a href=#"pt"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#pt">More information</a><p> Feb. 17, 2002 Joy May Hilden<br> BEDUIN WEAVING IN ARAB LANDS<a href=#"jh"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#jh">More information</a><p> March 19, 2002 Peter Poullada<br>  Qishlaq and Yaylaq, Bazaar and Chaikhana: Memories of the Hindu Kush 1952-1976. 7 PM, The Jim Blackmon Gallery Pine Street, San Francisco<a href=#"pp"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#pp">More information</a><p> April 7, 2002 Jim Dixon: A visit to Occidental<a href=#"jd2"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#jd2">More information</a><p> May 7, 2002 Manastir kelims A talk by Davut Mizrahi 110 south hall, uc berkeley<br><a href=#"dvm"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#dvm">More information</a><p> June 27, 2002 Robert P. Piccus, Tibetan Rugs A Collector s Odyssey At the Sandra Whitman Gallery 361 Oak Street San Francisco, CA 94102<a href=#"rp"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#rp">More information</a><p> August 10, 2002 Explore Passages the Armenian Rug Exhibition with a commentary on the rugs by Dr. Eiland. Herbst International Exhibition Hall The Presidio, San Francisco<br><a href=#"me"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#me">More information</a><p> Sept. 10, 2002 Natalia Nekrassova Ersari Rugs of the Turkomans Alexander's Rugs in Mill Valley<a href=#"nn"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#nn">More information</a><p> October 23 2002 An Exhibition of Jim Dixon s Kesa<a href=#"jd3"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#jd3">More information</a><p> November 19, 2002 Heavenly Gardens: Early Rugs of the Near and Far East from the Collection of Jim Dixon The Bedford Gallery, in the Dean Lester Regional Center for the Arts, 1601 Civic Drive, Walnut Creek, CA 94596<a href=#"hg"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#hg">More information</a><p> December 10, 2002. Arthur Leeper<br> A Review of the 2002 International Chinese Silk Conference in Hangzhou, China San Francisco Bay Area Rug Society Annual Dinner 7PM, Tuesday La Mditerrane Restaurant 2936 College Avenue College Avenue, Berkeley<a href=#"al"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#al">More information</a><br> **********<p> February 26, 2003,Diane Mott<br> Curator of Textiles, The Fine Art Museums of San Francisco, speaking on The Ancient Art of Felt Fort Mason, San Francisco<a href=#"dm2"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#dm2">More information</a><p> March 27, 2003. Ekaterina Ermakova Uzbek Ikats and Traditional Costumes<br> The James Blackmon Gallery<br> 2140 Bush Street (between Fillmore & webster)<br> San Francisco, CA 94115<a href=#"ee"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#ee">More information</a><p> April 6, 2003, SFBARS Visits Jim Dixon at Occidental<a href=#"jd4"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#jd4">More information</a><p> April 10, 2003. Dr. Harald Bhmer, Laboratory for Natural Dyes, Marmara University, Istanbul  Natural Dyes and Synthetic Dyes: History and Differences. <br> Krimsa Gallery, 2190 Union Street (near Fillmore) San Francisco, 94123. Tel. 415-441-4321.<a href=#"hb"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#hb">More information</a><p> May 10, 2003. Pat Markovich,  Afghan War Rugs, 110 South Hall, UC Berkeley<a href=#"pm"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#pm">More information</a><p> June 14, 2003. Murray Eiland III,"Syrian and Mamluk Rugs and Textiles" San Francisco's Fort Mason, Building C, Third Floor, Room 362<p><a href=#"meiii"> <img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#meiii">More information</a><p> October 4th, 2003: 10am -12Noon, SHOW and TELL! New Acquisitions, Mystery Rugs and Old Favorites Room, Fort Mason, San Francisco, C205, C Building, 2nd floor<a href="#snt"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#snt">More information</a><p> October 21, 2003:Meeting 7-9pm Melissa Finklestein, Iranian Felt-Making, Sandra Whitman Gallery, 361 Oak Street, San Francisco, CA. <a href="#mf"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#mf">More information</a><p> <p> November 12, 2003:meeting 7-9pm Tom Cole: Turkmen Embroidery, Emmet Eiland's Oriental Rug Company 1326 Ninth Street ( at Gilman ) Berkeley, CA <a href="#tc"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#tc">More information</a><p> <p> December 17, 2003: SFBARS annual dinner.Greens Restaurant, Fort Mason, San Francisco. <br> Featured speaker Pamela Bensoussan, ASA, "Oriental Rugs in Western Paintings<p><a href="#pb"><img src="img/redgem.gif" width="13" height="13" hspace="3" valign="middle" border="0" alt="blue gem"></a>&nbsp;<a href="#pb">More information</a><p> <h3>Further information below<P></h3> <a name="rc"><p> APRIL 5 2001<br> WOVEN PASSION A JOURNEY TO POST EMBARGO IRAN<br> Spring of 2000 witnessed the termination of the U.S. embargo on Iranian goods. A door was opened and I was ushered through it. Persian art, culture, poetry and textiles have been a civilizing influence in my life since I spent four years practicing architecture in Iran during the 1960s. I encountered the miraculous in Persia during that period and have been reminded of that connection on almost a daily basis ever since. Impressions nourish our souls and my thirty-three year association with Persian rugs has been a veritable banquet! Although Carpets of the Inner Circle has placed its emphasis on older and older weavings, the architect and designer in me remains interested in the potential associated with new rugs. It was with a degree of genuine sadness that I witnessed the decline in production from Persia during the embargo period, made even less palatable by the rise in favor of imitators from Rumania, Turkey, Pakistan, India and China.<p> Before the embargo was terminated I was approached by members of a prominent Persian rug producing family, who had organized a modestly-sized network of cottage industry weavers throughout Iran, for suggestions relative to the potential production of new rugs for the American market. My response overwhelmed them! I immediately recognized this as an opportunity to repay, with gratitude and respect, some of what my past exposure to Persian culture and involvement with Persian rugs has given me. I enthusiastically embraced their efforts aimed at a post embargo production designed to recapture lost portions of the American market and to reestablish Persia as the international leader in the textile arts.<p> They respected my understanding of this market and the overview of Persian culture and textile art that I had developed as a result of my long-term exposure to it. The possibility of a joint venture into new rug production based on historically important examples tantalizingly presented itself. As my part of the bargain I assembled a photo portfolio of potential weavings from the finest rugs and carpets that I had been exposed to over the years. Armed with these examples, in July I set off for Iran once again, intent upon viewing the cottage industry weaving organization that my hosts had developed. And also, I was returning home, this esoteric, spiritual journey I am involved in, somehow mysteriously connected to Persia. <br> Roger G. Cavanna<p> <a name="jd"><p>April 8 and 22, 2001 Visit Jim Dixon s Occidental Home<p> Undoubtedly the hit of the ACOR San Francisco meeting was the visit to Jim Dixon s Occidental home, garden and rug collection. Jim Dixon has graciously invited SFBARS to visit him in Occidental once again. Please choose the date most convenient for you, and hopefully we will spontaneously decide to divide approximately in half so there well be room to contemplate this unique place. Please arrive between noon and four.<p> This is how Chris Fager of the Los Angeles Times described the impact of Jim Dixon s architecture and rugs during his visit (L.A. Times, December 28, 2000):<br> With cathedral ceilings soaring four stories high, the combination of airy, open space and colorful rare antique rugs can leave a visitor speechless.  Don t try to talk for a while, Dixon says to a first-time guest.  Just take it all in and see what you feel. The landscape designer and longtime rug collector& designed and built this undoubtedly singular retreat himself, primarily to display his rug collection.  I wanted to provide a carefully proportioned volume of space so that the impact will bring the mind to a stop and allow us to transcend our worldly tensions. <p> Hali described Jim s rugs as  one of the most distinctive and diverse private collections of oriental rugs anywhere in the world (Hali 109, March-April 2000):<p>  One of the most distinctive and diverse private collections of oriental collections anywhere in the world has been assembled over the past two and a half decades by the California-based landscape architect Jim Dixon. Well known to carpet cognoscenti in the San Francisco Bay Area, his name has been much less familiar internationally , at least until several of his Caucasian prayer rugs were included in a recent book on the subject. Wishing above all to be able to see and enjoy his collection, Dixon has taken the unusual, perhaps unprecedented step of designing his new home around the rugs<p> <a name="sw"><p>May 10, 2001  Exploring Rugs from East Turkistan <br> Sandra Whitman, 7:30 PM, May 10, 2001 361 Oak Street San Francisco, CA 94102<p> The talk will be illustrated by slides, handouts and the display of 18th to 20th Century East Turkistan rugs from Kashgar, Yarkand, Khotan, Kansu, and perhaps Aksu. There will be at least 24 rugs for discussion ranging from the sublime to the trite. Two fabulous new acquisitions will be exhibited, a four medallion Khotan woven on a traveling loom and a yellow ground Khotan with a double pomegranate tree emanating from a vase. Sandy s talk will explore four themes:<br> 1. A brief introduction to the history of carpet weaving in the area, the use and purpose of rugs and carpets, and the gaps in our knowledge. [A handout will be provided]<br> 2. A review of the area, of the influences of other cultures, what we do and don t know about<br> where the rugs were actually woven and by whom. [A map will be explored]<br> 3. A review of the classification strategies used to analyze rugs from East Turkistan, such as structural, design and color characteristics. [Rugs will be shown and analyzed]<br> 4. And, if there is time, the unanswered questions Sandra would most like to have answered.<p> Sandra Whitman practiced law for 29 years. In the 70's she developed a love for Blue and White Chinese rugs, which developed over the years into a love of Ningxia carpets. In 1994, while still practicing law, she commenced dealing in Chinese rugs, primarily those woven in Ningxia and Bao Tao. By 1998 she had retired from the law and devoted herself full time to dealing in Chinese rugs and textiles.<p> Sandra Whitman s Gallery is located at 361 Oak Street in San Francisco, one block South of the Fell Street Exit from Highway 101. Parking is scarce in the neighborhood, so carpooling is recommended. A parking lot and several excellent restaurants (such as the Hayes Street Grill) are available a few blocks away on Hayes Street.<p> <a name="aa"><p>August, 2001 Empire of the Sultans: Ottoman Art from the Khalili Collection The Asian Art Museum of San Francisco<p> One of the most important exhibitions of Ottoman Art ever to be shown on the West Coast opens on August 2, 2001 at the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco. It will be the last major show to be displayed in Golden Gate Park before the Museum moves to its new downtown location. On loan from the vast holdings of the London-based Nasser D. Khalili Collection, one of the world s most important private collections of Islamic art, Empire of the Sultans includes more than 200 objects spanning the six hundred years from the 14th Century to the early 20th Century.<p> At its height the Ottoman Empire stretched from North Africa across to Eastern Iran, and from Greece to Hungary. Originally a Turkic tribe from Central Asia, the Ottomans ruled for six centuries from their capital in Istanbul, creating the longest surviving dynastic state in Islamic, if not world, history. Their awe-inspiring Topkapi Palace compound became the center of artistic and aesthetic enterprise, setting the fashion and providing the base and patronage for artists and craftsmen from all over the Empire. Turks, Armenians, Greeks, Egyptians, Syrians and North Africans all contributed to the extraordinary vitality and beauty which are the hallmarks of Ottoman art.<p> The San Francisco show includes a wide variety of the illuminated Korans, exquisite calligraphy, elegant metalwork and scientific instruments, and the lustrous ceramics for which the Khalili Collection is justly famous. Of particular interest to SFBARS members are the carpets and textiles selected for the touring exhibition, including what appears to be a very well preserved  Star Usak carpet probably dating from the second half of the 15th Century. Amongst the rest, there are two Cairene Ottoman rugs dating from the 17th Century, and a beautiful selection of ten or more woven-silk textiles not previously exhibited in the USA. Included in the group are examples of 16th Century silk lampas from Bursa, an elegant brocaded  saf wall hanging from the North African Ottoman provinces also 16th or 17th Century and an embroidered bridal cover from Northern Greece of the same era.<p> Illustrated on the facing page is an Ottoman court prayer rug of a type described in depth by Charles Grant Ellis in the  The Ottoman Prayer Rugs (Textile Museum Journal 1969, pp. 5-22). Ellis describes eleven rugs and fragments, with several more having appeared since his study. Ellis divides the surviving pieces into two groups, roughly based upon whether they had silk or wool foundations. The silk foundation pieces - which usually show patches of ivory or light blue cotton in the pile - he attributed to Bursa, while the wool foundation pieces were given a Cairo attribution. Ellis defines as prototypical a group including the piece in the Osterreichischen Museum fr Angewanste Kunst in Vienna (Sarre and Trenkwald, I, Pl. 56); an example with its vertical mid-section missing in the Turk ve Islam Eserleri Musezi in Istanbul; a rug in Berlin (Ellis, 1969, Fig. 3); and the Ballard column rug in the Metropolitan Museum of Art (Dimand and Mailey, Oriental Rugs in the Metropolitan museum of Art, Fig. 188). Each shares a version of basically the same palmette and curved leaf border, along with essentially the same minor borders. The knotting, as for all rugs described as Ottoman court rugs, is asymmetrical, and in these examples ranges between 385 knots per inch in the Istanbul piece to 288 in the Ballard rug.<p> The Vienna example, like one from the McMullan Collection (McMullan, Islamic Carpets, Pl. 4), is covered with a lavish design of large flowing lancet-shaped leaves and blossoms. This design is dramatically different from Persian rugs of the 16th century, although some have attributed the development of this Ottoman court style to the occupation of Tabriz by the Ottoman army on several occasions during the early 16th century. It is possible - but by no means confirmed by any documentation - that the Turks brought back with them experienced Persian carpet weavers, thus providing one explanation for the asymmetrical knots. The Istanbul and Berlin rugs, together with a fragment in Budapest (Ellis, 1969, Fig. 9) and several other examples show an open field below the arch. However, columns appear along the side in the Berlin and Budapest rugs and become prominent features on the Ballard carpet, which also shows a small hanging lamp. One should probably keep in mind that these formats had previously been used during Byzantine times, often with a saint or other personage shown below the arch.<p> Ellis listed seven of the wool foundation pieces, which he attributed to Cairo, although they show similar designs to the silk foundation pieces. One example in the Topkapi (Rogers and Tezcan, Topkapi Carpets, Pl. 1) has been described as the personal prayer rug of Ahmet I (1602-1617), and in general these pieces are thought to date slightly later than the silk foundation pieces. This is far from an established fact, and the two types may well have been contemporaneous. Examples at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (Dimand and Mailey, Fig. 191) and St. Petersberg (Ellis, 1969, Fig. 15) show field patterns similar to those of the Vienna type, but examples in The Textile Museum (Ellis, 1969, Fig. 13) and the Ahmet I piece in the Topkapi have open fields except for a wreath-like floral device. Most of the major and minor borders of these pieces resemble those of the silk-foundation rugs.<p> Ellis s attribution of the silk foundation rugs to Bursa and the wool foundation pieces to Cairo may well require a re-examination, as the Bursa attribution is based on the slenderest evidence. Indeed, if these silk foundation pieces had Z-spun woolen yarns, there might be some reason to attribute them to some place other than Egypt, but Ellis himself supplies data to the effect that major pieces in Vienna, Berlin, and New York show S-spun silk warps, and the date for several others is questionable.<p> Another of the interesting rugs included in the exhibition is filled with a striking stylized palmette and tulip design and attributed to the Eastern Caucausus, circa 1700. Of particular interest to the Bay area is the provenance tracing the rug to a Butterfield & Butterfield auction in 1988 and its inclusion in a well-known private collection in Seattle before making its way into the Khalili Collection.<p> There is an excellent illustrated exhibition catalog available from the Asian Art Museum or from the exhibition s U.S. organizers and managers, Art Services International of Alexandria, Virginia. As usual, the Museum has organized a number of lectures and programs to accompany the Empire of the Sultans exhibition, including a special after-hours viewing accompanied by special music on Thursday August 9 from 6-10PM<p> <a name="pl"><p>September 30, 2001 Patricia T. Leiser, Mosaics: the missing link? 109 South Hall, UC Berkeley<p> Over a number of years living, studying and traveling in the Mediterranean and Islamic worlds, often visiting classical sites and museums by day and rug shops at night, I have at times been struck by a resemblance between Roman mosaics and oriental carpets. At first, this seems surprising as the former are composed of hard immovable stone and the latter of flexible, portable fabric. Furthermore, the two are apparently separated in time by one or two thousand years, and belong to two distinctly different cultural traditions [1]. Do their similarities arise then simply from the functional coincidence that they both serve as decorative floor coverings, or is there some direct connection?<p> Carved threshold slabs in Assyrian palaces appear to be stone reproductions of textiles or carpets of which the oldest complete pile carpet, the Pasaryk rug, would seem to derive [2]. Were classical mosaics likewise modeled on contemporary weavings of the time whose legacy could have been carried on in later kilim tapestries and pile carpets? Or could these later weavings have been influenced, even if indirectly, by the patterns in the mosaics? Many scholars have noted similarities between rugs and mosaics [3], while a contrary view warns that apparent resemblances are just as likely to be independent developments of motifs [4]. In order to determine the extent of the similarities and if they are "genetic" and have a direct relationship and/or a common source, I have made a preliminary survey comparing and contrasting Greco-Roman and Byzantine mosaics with traditional kilim and carpet designs. I restricted myself primarily to Turkey and began by focusing on border patterns, a conservative decorative device shared by all three [5].<p> <a name="et"><p>October 23, 2001. Elena Tzareva,  Central Asian Rugs in the Russian Ethnographic Museum, The Sandra Whitman Gallery, 361 Oak Street, SF.<p> Elena Tzareva is Curator of the Central Asian Department at the Russian Ethnographic Museum in Saint Petersburg. Her 1984 book on Rugs and Carpets from Central Asia: The Russian Collections describes and analyzes the historical collections of Turkoman, Kirghiz, Uzbek, Karakalpak, Baluch and Kazakh rugs from Central Asia preserved in the Russian Ethnographic Museum. Her talk for SFBARS will focus on the little known weaving traditions of the non-Turkoman tribes of Central Asia.<p> <a name="dm"><p>December 3, 2001 the Annual SFBARS Dinner<br> The Aegean Grill 1403 Solano Avenue (at Carmel St.) Albany, CA Featured Speaker Diane Mott, FAMSF<p> ***************<p> 2002<p> <a name="pt"><p>January 28, 2002 Parviz Tanavoli<br>  The Lion in the Art and Culture of Iran <p> The Lion Rugs are a group of tribal rugs depicting the image of the lion as the main motif, first identified as a group by Parviz Tanavoli in the early 1970 s. In 1974 they were exhibited by museums in the United States, including at the Textile Museum in Washington D.C., by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service. Since then the Lion Rugs have been exhibited in Australia, Canada, England, Germany, Switzerland and Iran. They have traveled and exhibited more than any other rug collection known to date. Though the oldest of the known Lion rugs do not predate the 19th century, literary and historical references indicate that Lion Rugs in Iran date back to the 12th century. In his lecture Parviz Tanavoli will discuss various types of Lion Rugs made by the Qashqa i, the Lor and Bakhtiari tribes, as well as those made in other parts of Iran. He will also discuss the lion motif in other art forms such as coins, mosque banners and stone lions and will discuss their relation to lion rugs. The talk will be hosted by Emmett Eiland s Oriental Rug Company, 1326 Ninth Street, in Berkeley.<p> <a name="jh"><p>Feb. 17, 2002 Joy May Hilden<br> BEDUIN WEAVING IN ARAB LANDS<p> Joy will present a slide/lecture program on "Beduin Weaving in Arab Lands". She is an expert in Beduin weaving, having lived in Saudi Arabia for twelve years with her teacher-husband, doing primary field research among nomadic, semi-nomadic and settled Beduin. A teacher and artist, she documented the spinning, weaving and dyeing of women throughout Saudi Arabia. In addition to their travels throughout the Kingdom, she and her husband also visited Qater, Oman, Jordan, Syria and Egypt. Ms. Hilden has photographed extensively the weavings she found, the nomads and their lifestyle. She has completed a book that is waiting for publication, has given papers, seminars and workshops at conferences, and has published several magazine articles. You may visit her web site at: www.beduinweaving.com. (Note her spelling of Beduin.)<p> The meeting will be held at her home, so SFBARS members may see her collection of nomadic weavings, some too large to bring to another site and seldom seen elsewhere. Joy will show slides of weavings made and used by Arab nomads, the techniques used to make them, and the weavers' lifestyle. She will also demonstrate spinning.The Hildens live on the corner of Shattuck and Marin, a block uphill from the Arlington Circle and fountain. Take the Buchanan St. exit from highway 880 and head toward the hills. Buchanan becomes Marin and winds through residential neighborhoods. If you're coming from Berkeley, south of Marin, it is easiest to travel on Martin Luther King or Oxford. Avoid Shattuck, since it turns into Sutter and Henry and goes into the Solano Tunnel, which is beneath the Arlington Circle. Please do not park on Marin Ave. If you get lost, call 510-526-2266.<p> Excerpt from the essay  Introduction to Tents, from Joy May Hilden s Website.  How would you like to live in a large cloth home, protected from the heat, cold and wind by handwoven walls and ceilings, your voice and footsteps muffled and absorbed by the dark goat hair fabric? Some Arabian nomads, the Beduin, still live this way. As you sit on cushions and rugs on soft sand, watching smoke from the cooking fire curl upward, you smell the aroma of freshly ground and brewed Arabian coffee. As you wander through the rooms of the spacious, low-roofed dwelling, you are caught by light drifting through the weave of the cloth, throwing its pattern on you and the undulating cool sand underfoot. You are told that your hostess made the tent and the rugs, cushions and saddlebags which are in use throughout the tent. She shows you her loom. Yarns over twenty-five feet long are stretched on heavy beams which are staked into the sand. It looks deceptively simple until she starts to weave. She sits on the ground, pushing and pulling, beating and plucking, to create the thick dense cloth that will withstand the severe sand, wind and wear of nomadic life. She shows you how she spins the strong, heavily twisted yarn on a simple hand spindle. She sits with a distaff full of twisted bunches of sheeps' wool tucked under her left arm. She holds the spindle in her right hand and turns it quickly in her open palm, guiding the stream of fleece from the distaff with her left hand. <p> <a name="pp"><p>March 19, 2002 Peter Poullada<br>  Qishlaq and Yaylaq, Bazaar and Chaikhana: Memories of the Hindu Kush 1952-1976. 7 PM, The Jim Blackmon Gallery Pine Street, San Francisco<p> My talk will be based on the collection of almost 1000 slides of Afghanistan taken by the Poullada family over the course of three decades. I will use about 100 slides, mostly from the early 1950's to illustrate the transhumant life-cycle of the nomadic pastoral tribes of Afghanistan showing their migration from winter to summer pastures. These will illustrate the Turkic, Chahar Aimaq and Pashtun nomads (the "maldar of north-west and southwest Afghanistan on their migration routes into the Hazarajat, the high mountainous region of the western Hindu Kush. I will demonstrate how their routes congregate into the region of the Panjao, the "five watersheds and the nearby pasturelands of Yakowlan, "the Yekke Oleng or great pasture land of the Hazarajat. I will show scenes of the landscapes that the nomads pass through as they climb from their Winter quarters, the "qishlaq up to their "yaylaq the Summer pastures, as well as the farming villages, the bazaars and religious sites they encounter on their journeys. My goal will be to demonstrate the symbiotic relationship that has developed between nomads and farmers, showing how they benefit from the practice of a mixed economy of pastoralism, farming and trading.<p> Using photos taken on their migration routes I will also try to delineate some of the tribal groups that nomadize in western Afghanistan and discuss the role of military, political and social forces in their ethnogenesis and historical development. Finally I will show a series of views of the summer encampments (their "Yurt ) and identify the differing types of tents used by the turkco-mongol, Chahar Aimaq, and Pashtun maldars. Textiles will be seen only in the practical context of their daily use.<p> After the lecture I would welcome a Show and Tell and encourage participants to bring in their favorite examples of Chahar Aimaq weavings. These might include those from the Timuri, Taimani, Firuzkuhi and Jamshidi groups, as well as other "so-called Herat Baluch " weavings like the Mushwani or Adraskand. All of these are in fact Chahar Aimaq or Pashtun in origin and need to be differentiated from the other "so-called Baluch groups like the Salar-khani, Jani-Beg or Dokhtar-ghazi from the Torbat-i-Jam and Torbat-i-Haydari regions of western Khurasan.<p> A note about our speaker. Peter Poullada first came to Afghanistan in 1954 when his father was appointed to be the economic officer at the U.S. Embassy in Kabul. Leaving in 1958 Peter returned to live and travel throughout the country in 1967-68, 1974 and 1975-76. He has visited 28 of the 29 provinces of Afghanistan and made several trips to central Asia in the 1980's and 1990's. In May 2001 he spent three weeks driving 2000 miles through Chinese Turkestan. Peter has a degree in Middle Eastern History and Languages from Princeton University and wrote his Masters Thesis on the economic development of Afghanistan at the University of California-Berkeley. He has been an avid collector of central Asian tribal weavings for over 20 years and is currently doing research on the ethnogenesis and history of the Turkmen and Uzbek peoples of central Asia based on Islamic and Russian primary sources from the 13th to the 19th century.<p> <a name="jd2"><p>April 7, 2002 Jim Dixon: A visit to Occidental<br> SFBARS members who have not yet had the pleasure of seeing some of Jim Dixon's vast and important rug collection in his home in Occidental should not miss this opportunity. Most of those who have already had a chance to visit will want to do so again before he retires from view this currently exhibited group of rugs. It is a rare experience to see these museum quality pieces in a Cathedral-like setting--a home he built specifically to house them.<p> The viewer is overwhelmed by the power of many exceptionally large 16th, 17th, and 18th Century carpets, even when fragmentary. Moreover, these early carpets have a subtlety of design and complexity of color that is lacking in 19th Century rugs.<p> Weather permitting, in addition to the some 90 rugs and fragments in the house, Jim plans to spread out an additional group on the patios outside.<p> Carpets within the house are arranged in individual alcoves by geographical area: Western Turkish; Ersari Beshire; North and South Caucasian; Classical and Village Persian rugs and fragments.<p> Among the Western Turkish rugs is the largest rug on display--a 14 1/2 x 24' Medallion Oushak circa 1500 with a particularly rare design. Other rugs in the Turkish alcove demonstrate variations of Medallion and Star Oushak formats, and some attentive, relaxed viewing reveals surprising uses of intentional negative space.<p> The Persian alcove has as its centerpiece the upper quarter of a 17th Century Chodor Bagh Garden Carpet, again, the other carpets are variations on design elements in this archetypal theme.<p> The North wing has 40 Caucasian rugs of the 18th and 19th centuries, each organized around the Memling gul design. This stepped octagon motif appeared as early as the 4th millenium BCE in the perimeter walls of central Asian cities, taking its name from the rugs portrayed in the 15th Century paintings of Hans Memling.<p> Other alcoves feature the major part of Jim Dixon's collection of Caucasian 16th-18th Century long rugs, i.e. 18x20 feet. Shown alongside these classical rugs are village examples using these same motifs and symbols.<p> Virtually all the rugs and fragments presently hung depict the lotus as a design element. Jim has told us he will talk twice during the day about individual rugs and for those interested his evolving theories of "rugs as cosmological maps." Jim says, "those present who wish to escape such remarks can flee to other parts of the house and fortify themselves at the buffet, or wander freely in the gardens, weather permitting where thousands of tulips and much else will be in bloom." This year members will be asked to remove their shoes upon entering the house--so bring slippers or an extra pair of socks.<p> <a name="dvm"><p>May 7, 2002 Manastir kelims A talk by Davut Mizrahi 110 south hall, uc berkeley<p> In the late 70 s for the first time carpets labelled  Manastir appeared on the market, formerly simply classified as  Western Anatolia and therefore included in a medley of different production areas. This medley enclosed most tribal carpets from Western Anatolia; most collectors in these days focused their interest and knowledge on village and town- carpets like those from Bergama, Canakkale and others.<p> A couple of years later the first Kelims, striking in their minmalistic compositions of simple forms, have been classified  Manastir ; the more general term  Western Anatolian remained still useful as it could not be wrong anyway. The name Manastir originally had been used because of the main trading place for these textiles, a small town in today s Macedonia Manastir nowadays is called Bitola. A further explanation spread by carpet dealers was, as Manastir means  Monastery as well, that such carpets had been produced in monasteries or for the use in monasteries.<p> Very little was and is known about the people who had woven these carpets and kelims. In the last years carpet dealers and other informants agreed insofar as to say that the weavers had come from tribes originally descending from central Anatolia, that have been settled by the Ottoman government on the Balkans, from where they migrated back to western Anatolia when the European provinces of the Ottoman Empire experienced a general breakdown, which made it impossible for semi-nomadic tribes to continue their traditional life-styles. Part of the population might have joined as well larger Turcic communities in Bulgaria, to which they had been neighbours for centuries. Different influences are recognisable as the scattered parts of the Balkan tribes had to live under the dominance of the stronger indigenous groups who offered them more or less voluntary a new homestead. Most of the textile production seems to have been made for their own not to be sold on the market. Sources which give the information , that one century ago a great number of Manastir textiles have passed the Istanbul market seem to have confused Manastir weavings with other weavings from the Balkans like Sarky, which definitely have been a success on the Istanbul market. We will be able to present some thirty slides of Manastir kelims, in addition some material about neighbouring tribes and should try to carry a few examples in original.<p> <a name="rp"><p>June 27, 2002 Robert P. Piccus, Tibetan Rugs A Collector s Odyssey At the Sandra Whitman Gallery 361 Oak Street San Francisco, CA 94102<p> The opening of Tibet to foreign travelers in the mid-1980 s presented a unique opportunity to explore the range of early textiles, both domestic and foreign, that had been collected and preserved, in many cases for centuries, in the temples and households. A surprising number of art works had miraculously escaped the wholesale destruction of Tibet s cultural legacy by the Chinese Red Guards during the cultural revolution. R.P. Piccus s talk will focus on one of these discoveries the broad range of early rugs produced in Tibet during the 18th and 19th Centuries when Tibet was largely insulated from foreign visitors and influence.<p> Bob and his wife Alice lived in Hong Kong from early 1968 to the end of 1999, and were thus able to take advantage of the flow of art leaving China during that period. Among other things such as Annamese porcelain, Ming furniture, Japanese folk art, Southeast Asian sculpture and silver they collected Chinese rugs mainly Ningxia rugs made for the Tibetan lamaistic temples, and Tibetan ritual objects, mainly silver. They were thus well primed to collect the early Tibetan rugs that began to appear in Hong Kong, Peking and Kathmandu markets in the mid-1980 s when China finally opened Tibet to controlled tourism. This opening provided a rare window of opportunity to collect in a  newly discovered area Tibetan rugs.<p> One of the most stimulating aspects of collecting in a new area is the intellectual challenge of deciding how to classify the various types of rugs and to determine their age, all in the absence of documentation. This process will be the focus of the talk. Please bring your Tibetan rugs and antiquities to add to the discussion after Bob s talk.<p> <a name="me">August 10, 2002 Explore Passages the Armenian Rug Exhibition with a commentary on the rugs by Dr. Murray Eiland. Herbst International Exhibition Hall The Presidio, San Francisco<p> Passages: Celebrating Rites of Passage in Inscribed Armenian Rugs, displays 114 rugs, each telling a story of a particular time and place. Woven for specific occasions such as birth, marriage and death, they speak of joy, love and sorrow. The rug embodies the collective heritage of a people as well as the creative individuality of the weaver that is its beauty and mystery. Dr. Murray L. Eiland, Jr. will lead SFBARS members in a tour of the rug exhibition.<p> <a name="nn"><p>Sept. 10, 2002 Natalia Nekrassova Ersari Rugs of the Turkomans Alexander's Rugs in Mill Valley<p> The topic is Ersari rugs, their common features and peculiarities compared with other Turkmen rugs, especially specific patterns, compositions and colours. I will show slides and I need one projector. I have a slide tray for Kodak carousal projector. My topic will be about Ersari rugs, their common and specific features compared with other Turkmen rugs, as well as peculiarities of Ersari patterns, compositions and colours. Ersari rugs, their common and specific features compared with other Turkmen rugs, as well as peculiarities of Ersari patterns, compositions and colours<p> I have Master degree in the History of Art in the Moscow State University. I worked as a curator of Central Asian and Caucasian rugs and decorative art in the State Museum of Oriental Art in Moscow about quarter of the century and also was a Head of the Research department of Central Asian and Caucasian Art in the same museum. I have articles and catalogues published on this theme. I had an opportunity to be in the Caucasus and Central Asia a few times every year while working in the museum. I was an author of more than 30 exhibitions in Russia and abroad. I was a curator of rug and textile collections in the State Museum of Oriental Art in Moscow about quarter of a century. Now I am a guest curator in the Textile Museum of Canada. I was an author of more than 30 exhibitions on rugs, textiles and decorative art in Russia and abroad. I have some catalogues and articles published. I was lucky to have an opportunity to visit Central Asia and the Caucasus a few times a year while working in the Museum that helped me to in my work with Oriental rugs and textiles.<p> <a name="jd3"><p>October 23 2002 An Exhibition of Jim Dixon s Kesa<p> Our next meeting will be an informal get together at Jim Dixon's home at 337 Colusa Ave. in Kensington at 7:30 PM on Wednesday, October 23rd. Be prepared to walk up quite a few stairs. Jim's house is the one in back.<p> There will be a wonderful display of Japanese Kesa on view. For those not familiar with these textiles, Kesa are Japanese Buddhist priest robes. They are fairly large (approximately 4 x 7) rectangular textiles formed of panels and patches of brocaded silk--often utilizing gold thread. This is quite an extraordinary collection of these interesting and beautiful pieces. The LACMA website describes kesa thusly: The Buddhist priest's robe, or kesa, is usually made up of seven to twenty-five narrow panels (jo) composed of patchwork squares and assembled into a large, flat rectangle, which, somewhat like a toga, drapes under the left arm and fastens by two corners on the right shoulder. According to legend, its original shape and composition derive from the fine gold kesa that Buddha's mother made for him. Obeying vows of poverty, these robes were made from donated pieces of old cloth and rags. Eventually the cloaks acquired the status of investiture and were handed down from master to disciple as symbols of priestly descent and authority. As Buddhist ceremonial observance became more complex and hieratic, the patchwork kesa, composed of finer and finer fragments, grew more luxurious.<p> For more information see:<br> http://www.nga.gov.au/ConservationArt/micros.htm<br> http://www.lacma.org/art/perm_col/costumes/costume2.htm<br> http://www.asianartbykyoko.com/catalog/Antiques:<br> RegionalArt:Asian:Japanese:Textiles.html<br> http://www.cloudband.com/frames.mhtml/magazine/articles2q01/books_jackson_aedta_0601.html<p> <a name="hg"><p>November 19, 2002 Heavenly Gardens: Early Rugs of the Near and Far East from the Collection of Jim Dixon The Bedford Gallery, in the Dean Lester Regional Center for the Arts, 1601 Civic Drive, Walnut Creek, CA 94596<p>  Heavenly Gardens: Early rugs of the Near and Far East," a major exhibition of rugs from Jim Dixon's collection, will open Tuesday, November 19th at the Bedford Gallery in the Dean Lester Regional Center for the Arts in Walnut Creek. SFBARS will have its November meeting at the gallery in conjunction with the opening of the show on Tuesday, November 19th at 5:30-7:30. We hope to see you all there. Jim will lead a walk through of the exhibit for SFBARS members.<p> The sixty or so of his rugs and rug fragments (dating from the 15th to 19th c.) on view will be primarily organized geographically-- Caucasia, Turkey, Persia, Turkmenistan, Turkestan and China. Within this context rugs will be grouped in an attempt to show historical development. Development of various design motifs as well as cosmological concepts as they relate to rug design, will also be apparent in the choice of rugs exhibited. Visual appeal--strength of color and design--as well as historical, cosmological and interest in progression of design will make a combined visual and intellectual treat. Many SFBARS members are already familiar with portions of the Dixon collection having attended meetings at his homes in Occidental and Kensington. Moreover, an article on his collection appeared in Hali Magazine (Issue 109). Many of his rugs were also seen in the 1990 "Trefoil" rug exhibition at Mills College. The Bedford exhibit will be a chance to again see some of his collection in a gallery setting.<p> The Dean Lesher Center is located at 1601 Civic Drive, Walnut Creek, 4 blocks south of the Walnut Creek Bart Station. Hours are Tue-Sun, 12 noon to 5 pm and also Th, Fri, and Sat evenings 6-8 PM. The Gallery is closed on Mondays. The show will run until January 5, 2003. Gallery invitations will be sent to the SFBARS mailing list.<p> <a name="al"><p>December 10, 2002. Arthur Leeper<br> A Review of the 2002 International Chinese Silk Conference in Hangzhou, China San Francisco Bay Area Rug Society Annual Dinner 7PM, Tuesday La Mditerrane Restaurant 2936 College Avenue College Avenue, Berkeley The annual dinner of the San Francisco Bay Area Rug Society will be held at La Mditerrane restaurant in Berkeley on December 10, 2002. The gathering begins at 7PM, and dinner will begin at 7:30PM. La Mditerrane is located at 2936 College Avenue (just North of Ashby Avenue) in Berkeley. Parking is available in the metered public lot behind the restaurant. La Mditerrane is one of the top ranked restaurants for Middle Eastern Food in the Bay Area. Located in the Rockridge district of Berkeley it has been a favorite with East Bay diners for years. We have arranged a special feast for this year's SFBARS Annual Dinner, a fixed menu offering that includes an excellent sampling of the cuisines of the Levant. We will begin with a magnificent Meze in the style of Old Beirut; hummous, tahina, kibbe and other tasty cold and hot meze, plus a selection of lamb in filo, chicken kebab and other kebabs. For vegetarians there is an alternative Meze with equally fine dishes. This will be followed by a selection of typical Levantine desserts, baklava and a La Mditerrane special dessert. A choice of red or white California wines will be available plus at the end, of course, espresso or other coffee of choice. The dinner costs $30 a person. Please reserve your place by sending a check for $30 per person to Pat Leiser, SFBARS Treasurer, 101 San Jose Court, Vacaville CA 95688.<p> Our speaker will be the Arthur Leeper, who will report on the International Chinese Silk Conference in Hangzhou, China last month. In a first for China the presentations at the recent conference at the Hangzhou National Silk Museum on the archaeology of silk was presented either in English, or with simultaneous English translations, clearly catering to an international audience. The attempt was an ambitious and largely successful gamble, and the contacts between Chinese scholars and excavators and the visiting foreign scholars and enthusiasts were often remarkable, and hopefully built enduring bridges between worlds that often operate in complete isolation from each other. Arthur Leeper has been interested in Asian textiles and rugs since his travels to Asia began in the early 1970's. He helped curate the first museum show of Tibetan rugs at The Textile Museum in 1983 and has written and lectured extensively on that part of the world. He has long had an interest in early Chinese textiles, initially sparked by the remarkably preserved textiles that were discovered in Tibet over the last decades.<p> <a name="dm2"> February 26, 2003,Diane Mott<br> Curator of Textiles, The Fine Art Museums of San Francisco, speaking on The Ancient Art of Felt Fort Mason, San Francisco<br> Felt has been a subject of particular interest to me for many years, an interest shared by SFBARS Board Member Peter Lyman. His enthusiasm for the subject and recent gifts of felts to the De Young Museum s Textile Department have prompted me to speak on this ancient art at SFBARS February meeting.<p> There is something almost magical about felt. From the way it is produced to its unique properties, astounding versatility, and its ancient origins, felt is one of the most intriguing of all fabrics. This lecture will describe how, by the simplest means, loose, dirty wool fleece is transformed into a smooth, coherent fabric, one that can be molded easily into three-dimensional forms and that can vary in texture and thickness from the soft suppleness of chamois to the density and rigidity of hardwood. It will examine the earliest archaeological evidence of felt and trace its history from the Early Bronze Age to the present, looking at how and where felt probably developed and at some of the many ways it has been used throughout its 5,000-year life. The focus will be on felt-making and felt design in the Near East, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia, the probable birthplace of the fabric and where it still retains vestiges of its original importance.<p> Following the talk, there will be a brief update on plans for the new De Young Museum building and for the Textile Department s spaces in it. A 20-minute video on felt making among the Uyghurs of Xinjiang will be available following the lecture for those wishing to view it. Members are encouraged to bring examples of felt from their own collections for show and tell.<p> <a name="ee"><p>March 27, 2003. Ekaterina Ermakova Uzbek Ikats and Traditional Costumes<br> The James Blackmon Gallery<br> 2140 Bush Street (between Fillmore & webster)<br> San Francisco, CA 94115<p> Ekaterina Ermakova is the Head of the Caucasus and Central Asia Department of the Museum of Oriental Art in Moscow, a position she has held for the past three years. She graduated in 1980 from Moscow State University with a degree in Ethnology specializing in the embroideries and fabrics of Uzbekistan. She has participated in many ethnographic and archeological expeditions to Uzbekistan to acquire objects for the collection of the Museum. In 1995 she completed a Ph.D. in History concerning the jewelry of Bukhara. In 2002 she was the curator and co-wrote the catalogue for an important exhibit of Uzbek textiles based on the Tair Tairov collection in the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts in Moscow; this exhibit was reviewed in Hali magazine (#123, July-August 2002, pp. 34-35).<p> The presentation will consist of about 100 sides covering an introduction to the cultural history of Turkestan and especially Bukhara, and a description of both men and women s traditional dress. The role and place of these textiles in the lifestyle and traditional culture of Bukhara will be examined and examples will be shown of the interiors of the houses of Bukhara.<p> At the end of the lecture there will be time for a show and tell and the audience is encouraged to bring (or wear!) their favorite examples of Bukharan textile apparel. Since Ekaterina is a specialist in Uzbek jewelry she is happy to examine or talk about favorite jewelry items, so bring them as well. We look forward to a colorful and informative evening. Plentiful spaces are available in the Japan Center underground parking lot a few blocks away.<p> <a name="hb"><p>April 10, 2003. Dr. Harald Bhmer, Laboratory for Natural Dyes, Marmara University, Istanbul  Natural Dyes and Synthetic Dyes: History and Differences. <br> Krimsa Gallery, 2190 Union Street (near Fillmore) San Francisco, 94123. Tel. 415-441-4321.<p> What is the difference between a "natural" dye, and a "chemical", or synthetic one? Why do the colors of old carpets and textiles seem to "mellow," rather than fade? Why do we always hear dealers touting the fact that a rug is made with so-called natural dyes, or that a color is "bad" because its synthetic, and from where did the movement back to "natural" dyes in the world of oriental rugs come? Before the 1870s, most dyes and mordents were made from naturally occurring organic or mineral substances. Then, in the late 19th century, Europeans invented and marketed synthetically compounded, manufactured dyestuffs, which, with their bright and unusual colors and easy processing for dyers, swept the world, including the realm of hand-woven rugs in Asia. Dr. Harald Bhmer will tell us about the history of and differences between dyes and colors created by boiling up roots, leaves, insects and iron filings, and those made in the laboratory, and how they affect the dyeing of wool and silk. He will also cover the contemporary revival of "back to natural" dye projects in many parts of the world, and what this means to the local products, economies and cultures.<p> In the 1980s, Dr. Bhmer, a native of Delmenhorst, Germany, was a chemistry professor at the German high school in Istanbul, where he came to love oriental carpets. He wondered what happened to the beautiful colors in old Turkish carpets, and why they were no longer being used. He set off on a journey, both scientific and ethnographic, to re-discover the origins and formulas for dyeing materials with natural substances. Along with the Fine Arts Department of Marmara University, he founded DOBAG, the first of many world-wide projects which revived the production of naturally-dyed carpets and textiles. His new book Kkboya [Root Dyes] is a beautiful and definitive text on dyeing with natural substances; there will be copies available to buy. Dr. Bhmer invites members to bring examples of rugs, especially Turkish, made with both natural and synthetic dyes, to show as examples.<p> <a name="jd4"><p>April 6, 2003, SFBARS Visits Jim Dixon at Occidental<p> SFBARS members should not miss this opportunity some of Jim Dixon's vast and important rug collection in his home in Occidental. It is a rare experience to see these museum quality pieces in a home he designed and built specifically to house them. The event includes a buffet luncheon, begins at noon and ends around dusk. Jim s collection is featured in Hali 109, but even Hali s sumptuous photographs don t begin to convey the scale of Jim s home and the beauty of his collection. Jim s garden is another facet of the philosophy and sensibility that shaped his architectural vision and collection each is worth contemplating on its own, and in relation to the others.<p> <a name="pm"><p>May 10, 2003. Pat Markovich,  Afghan War Rugs, 110 South Hall, UC Berkeley<p> Review: Pat Markovich on Afghan Political and War Rugs<p> On May 10, 2003 Pat Markovich spoke to SFBARS about Afghan Political and War Rugs. She described these as rugs that document power struggles, whether political or religious, and which tell us something about the way that weavers experience contemporary history. Today these rugs are often treated as folk art and are not of interest to museums, galleries or collectors - and yet they are documents with which illiterate weavers describe the experience of war and political conflict, and in the long run will become part of the historical record.<p> Political rugs are pictorial, and often include writing, even by illiterate weavers. Pat showed a number of rugs to illustrate the way the weapons of war evolve into more abstract rug designs. Her son - Dr. Michael Treece - identified AK74 and AK47 designs in rugs, drawings of grenades that gradually evolved into Boteh-like designs, and the way that Russian helicopters and bird designs are juxtaposed in rugs, and gradually merge. Pat also showed a United Nations poster printed on cloth that was designed to warn Afghans about the danger of 'toe poppers' (plastic bottles filled with nitroglycerin), and how those drawings later show up in rugs. <p> Pat also made a number of interesting comments about why she collects Political and War Rugs. In part, by collecting rugs that document contemporary history when others dismiss them as kitsch she fulfills the responsibility of collectors to preserve folk art forms before they are recognized as important by high-culture institutions like museums. In part, it is possible to build a comprehensive collection of these rugs because they are inexpensive, and one never knows when one will come across an important discovery. And most importantly, these rugs have personality, they tell something about the life of the weaver, and her attempt to make sense of terrifying situations. <p> pl editor<p> <a name="meiii"><p>June 14, 2003. Murray Eiland III, "Syrian and Mamluk Rugs and Textiles," San Francisco's Fort Mason , Building C, Third Floor, Room 362<p> Murray Eiland III has kindly agreed to speak to us on Syrian/Mamluk rugs at our next meeting. It will take place between 2:30 and 4:30 at Fort Mason in San Francisco in Building C, third floor, room 362.<p> From the the San Francisco Bay Area Rug Society June 2003 Newsletter:<p> Syrian weavings have a long documented history, from the textiles of Palmyra through the Arab textiles woven today. Murray Eiland III will review this history, and present slides and examples of Syrian weavings made during the last century. He will also address one of the most important unanswered questions about Syrian rugs - Did Mamluk rugs come from Syria or Egypt? During the Mamluk period Syria was also a center for art and culture, but there is little direct evidence to suggest that they wove rugs in Syria. Egypt is usually the preferred origin for these rugs, not least because pile weaves are not well known from this region. Drawing upon architecture and elements of design, evidence will be presented that suggest the Mamluks did weave rugs in Syria.<p> Murray Eiland III is currently visiting California while in the midst of a Fulbright grant to work in Syria with the Ministry of Tourism and Department of Antiquities on cultural resource management. Murray is one of the most important young scholars in the rug and textile world, and is currently writing up his archeological research on 14th Century textiles in the Muguti cave complex in Georgia. Murray will bring some Syrian rugs and is happy to assist in a show and tell. He particularly invites local collectors to bring Mamluk fragments and Arab textiles, or examples of textiles that are Arab influenced from Central Asia or South Asia - or anywhere!<p> PL editor<p> **********<p> "Syrian weavings have a long documented history, from the textiles of Palmyra through the Arab textiles woven today. I will present slides and examples of Syrian weavings made during the last century. This leads naturally to the next question.<br> During the Mamluk period Syria was also a center for art and culture, but there is little direct evidence to suggest that they wove rugs in Syria. Egypt is usually the preferred origin for these rugs, not least because pile weaves are not well known from this region. Drawing upon architecture and elements of design, evidence will be presented that suggest the Mamluks did weave rugs in Syria." Murray Eiland<p> <a name="snt"><p> October 4th, 2003: 10am -12Noon, SHOW and TELL! New Acquisitions, Mystery Rugs and Old Favorites Room, Fort Mason, San Francisco, C205, C Building, 2nd floor<p> Have you always wanted to show off something in your collection? Well now this is your big chance. Bring in your newest purchase, your first purchase, the rug you have never figured out, the beautiful piece that has always puzzled you. Maybe you can stump our experts! This is your chance to talk about your own rugs or give your views on someone else's! It 's a chance to handle weavings and to examine them up close, and to meet and get to know other members of our Rug Society. <p> Your Host and Maitre'D will be SFBARS President Peter Poullada --- who freely confesses to knowing only about Turkmen rugs. Maybe you can stump him with your mysterious Anatolian-Tunisian piece. All rugs have a story, be prepared to bring one along. Audience participation encouraged and even required. Snacks and coffee will be provided. <p> **************<p> <a name="mf"><p><h3> </h3><p> October 21, 3003:Meeting 7-9pm Melissa Finklestein, Iranian Felt-Making, Sandra Whitman Gallery, 361 Oak Street, San Francisco, CA. <p> For the past two years Dodd and Melina Raissnia have been collecting and documenting felt rugs from Iran. They have found a mere handful of felters that are still making high quality felt rugs or, namads, as they are called in Iran. <p> In an effort to sustain this dying art form they have begun commissioning these felters to produce namads with the hope of creating a market for them in the U.S. Dodd and Melina will speak about their project and bring examples of namads from several regions of Iran including Turkmenistan. They will also screen a video made by Dodd last May documenting the namad making process of master felter, Hajali Halajion.<p> Melina is a painter and graphic designer who fell in love with felt when Dodd brought her a namad after returning from a trip to Iran in  98. Dodd has a backround in sales and loves to travel. Their decision to pursue this project was driven by a desire to work together and spend more time with their young son, Rahim.<p> **********<p> <a name="tc"><p><h3> </h3><p> November 12, 2003 Tom Cole: Turkmen Embroidery Emmet Eiland's Oriental Rug Company 1326 Ninth Street ( at Gilman ) Berkeley, CA<p> The subject of this talk is the often ignored field of Turkmen embroidery. Using slides taken over the past few years Tom Cole will discuss tribal attributions, designs and symbolism. Unlike other Turkmen weavings, this purely indigenous art form was never intended for commerce or export, making it a particularly interesting vehicle for understanding Turkmen culture. Distinctions in attributions will be explained, as well as the significance and the origins of much of the design repertoire that is seen in these weavings. <p> Tom Cole is a well known Bay Area -based private dealer and journalist who specializes in the study of tribal weavings and textiles from Central Asia. he has been active in the antique tribal rug and textile art trade for more than twenty-five years and has lived and traveled extensively in the Near East, Persia, Central Asia and along the Silk Road to China. Tom has also contributed to the understanding and appreciation of textile arts through his numerous contributions to HALI magazine including a landmark paper on Tibetan rugs, ( HALI 49, 1990), and others on Chinese ( Hali 67, 1993) and Baluch( weavings ( Hali 76, 1994 and Hali 97, 1998)As a contributing editor for Hali representing the magazine int he Bay Area, Tom has also written several entertaining routes in the arid deserts of Baluchistan, the battle-scarred landscape of northern Afghanistan and Mazar-i -Sharif and the labyrinthine back alleys of the forbidden city of Lhasa.<p> Tom will show examples of Turkmen embroidery and encourages all SF BARS members to bring their own pieces and share them with the group. Even if you don't have a Turkmen weaving, bring other Central Asian pieces that you would like Tom to examine and discuss. <p> ***********<p> <a name="pb"><p><h3> </h3><p> December 17, 2003<br> Pamela Bensoussan ASA: Oriental Rugs in Western Paintings Greens Restaurant, Fort Mason, San Francisco <p> Pamela Bensoussan, ASA, will be the speaker for this event.&nbsp; She has been involved with rugs since the late 60's, mounting small, choice exhibitions in her SF Bay area rug galleries. She moved to France in the early 70's, becoming the Hali editor for France and curating an important exhibition "Le Tapis: Art Traditionnel et Fonctionnel," with Carpets from the Louvre and other public and private French collections, in Boulogne-Billancourt, (see Hali French supplement 1982<p> She returned to the United States in 1984, and since that time has been involved in historic preservation and in the art and antique market, at various times owning an art gallery, French antique store and French restaurant.&nbsp; She is currently an accredited ASA appraiser of Oriental carpets and also an appraiser of art, antiques and historic real estate.&nbsp; Her rug publications include an important article in Hali April 1985 "The Masterweavers of Istanbul" as well as articles on Melas rugs (Hali 1982), Lotto rugs (Hali Sept 1981) and Harshang pattern carpets (Hali Sept 1981).<p>The topic of Oriental rugs in paintings first caught the attention of rug historians over a hundred years ago and continues to be of interest today.&nbsp; In recent decades it has been the focus of several exhibitions and research projects. There is now general consensus among connoisseurs as to the dating and probable origin of certain Oriental rug types that appear in Renaissance period paintings. These paintings are of particular importance because surviving carpets from this period and earlier are scarce. Comparison of carpets in paintings to actual carpets in museums and private collections has enabled the dating, grouping and identification of some early types. References to paintings that depict rugs are found in an increasing number of rug books, periodicals, auction and exhibition catalogues.Several carpet groups, motifs, and patterns have been named after the artists in whose works they first appear, or appear with some frequency such as Lotto, Holbein, Bellini&nbsp; and Memling.&nbsp; While these names now readily conjure up specific patterns, many who employ the terms have limited knowledge of the studies that formed our understanding of early Oriental rug history as documented in Western art. This presentation will look at the source information on the topic of oriental carpets in paintings and offer a road map to this vast subject.&nbsp; Principal categories of the depicted rug types will be briefly summarized. <p> <TD align=middle colSpan=4><A </FONT></A></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></DIV></TD></TR> </TBODY></TABLE> <P><BR></P></BODY> </html>